The Anarchist Prince

by Peculate

/
  • Streaming + Download

    Includes unlimited streaming via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.

      $0.50 USD  or more

     

1.
03:48
2.
01:48
3.
4.
5.

about

Tracks 3-5 released 8 November 2013
Tracks 1-2 released 13 July 2013

A series of songs with lyrics by Peter Kropotkin.

N.B. This album is a work in progress. It will be periodically expanded with new songs based on other works by Kropotkin. I will publish other albums in the mean time, returning to this project every once in a while.

SCORES available at Peculate.co/Scores.

credits

released November 8, 2013

Lyrics - Peter Kropotkin
Everything Else - Ben Norton

tags

license

about

Peculate

Progressive math metal meets jazz-infused avant-garde classical music
Peculate.co — Peculate is the solo project of composer and musician Ben Norton
BenNorton.com

contact / help

Contact Peculate

Streaming and
Download help

Track Name: Moscow, 1842
(Instrumental)
Track Name: Mutual Aid
It is not love
and not even sympathy
upon which Society is based in [hu]mankind.

It is the conscience–
be it only at the stage of an instinct–
of human solidarity.

It is the unconscious recognition of the
force that is borrowed by each [hu]man
from the practice of mutual aid;

of the close dependency of everyone's happiness
upon the happiness of all;

and of the sense of justice, or equity,
which brings the individual to consider
the rights of every other individual
as equal to [her or] his own.

(Kropotkin, Mutual Aid (1902), Introduction)
Track Name: Common Property
Millions of human beings have labored to create this civilization on which we pride ourselves today. Other millions, scattered through the globe, labor to maintain it. Without them nothing would be left in fifty years but ruins.

There is not even a thought, or an invention, which is not common property, born of the past and the present. Thousands of inventors, known and unknown, who have died in poverty, have co-operated in the invention of these machines which embody the genius of humans.

Thousands of writers, of poets, of scholars, have labored to increase knowledge, to dissipate error, and to create that atmosphere of scientific thought, without which the marvels of our century could never have appeared. And these thousands of philosophers, of poets, of scholars, of inventors, have themselves been supported by the labor of past centuries. They have been upheld and nourished through life, both physically and mentally, by legions of workers and craftsmen of all sorts.

Common property.

There is not even a thought, or an invention, which is not common property, born of the past and the present. Thousands of inventors, known and unknown, who have died in poverty, have co-operated in the invention of these machines which embody the genius of humans.

Every machine has had the same history--a long record of sleepless nights and poverty, of disillusions and joys, of partial improvements, discovered by several generations of nameless workers.

(Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread (1892), chapter 1, part II)
Track Name: The Sum of Human Riches
Science and industry, knowledge and application, discovery and practical realization leading to new discoveries, cunning of brain and of hand, toil of mind and muscle--all work together. Each discovery, each advance, each increase in the sum of human riches, owes its being to the physical and mental travail of the past and the present.

By what right then can anyone appropriate the least morsel of this immense whole and say--This is mine, not yours?

(Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread (1892), chapter 1, part II)
Track Name: Business Talents
The landlord owes their riches to the poverty of the peasants, and the wealth of the capitalist comes from the same source.

Business talents.

If they choose a lucrative trade, and have "business talents," they will soon increase their income by doubling the number of people they exploit.

So they become a personage of importance. They can afford to give dinners to other personages--to the local magnates, the civic, legal, and political dignitaries. With their money they can "marry money"; by and by they may pick and choose places for their children, and later on perhaps get something good from the Government--a contract for the army or for the police.

(Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread (1892), chapter 4, part II)